How To Talk To Anyone

let-talk-featuredIf you're over fifty and recently single again, you need to get out and start meeting people. Funny about couples -- even when you're visiting friends, sometimes either the man or the woman will be the one who carries most of conversation, and sometimes the other partner gets used to not having to carry the ball in social situations and is only too happy to let their spouse do it. Of course, now that you're single again, if you were the quiet one, you have to learn how to do it yourself.

How To Talk To Anyone by Susan Jameson can help you learn to do it. The book is new and doesn't have any reviews yet, but it looks like it has some good solid advice. Chapter #1 talks about effective tools for communication, and chapter #2 gets right into "How to break the ice."

There are also sections for job interviews, dating, and public speaking. Plus there is more to it than this. But these two are pretty important. Often times we don't find ourselves in just one new situation. For example, if you moved away after your divorce, you could be looking for a job, or you may have forgotten how to ask someone for a date.

Here is what Susan says about it:

“How To Talk To Anyone” is jam-packed with very simple and easy to follow procedures which will help you develop strong conversation skills with people you know and people you don't know. This skill is meant to help you build lasting connections with people and feel at ease while doing it regardless of your knowledge of the subject or topic.

So if you want to learn the skills to not only break the ice but melt it away with your conversational skills, then “How To Talk To Anyone” is perfect for you!

The Kindle version of this book is being offered free today as part of an Amazon promotion. So if you need to improve your conversation skills, download it now by clicking here.

If you don’t want to miss any of these posts: on the right-hand side of the blog is a place where you can enter your email address, and I’ll send you any new posts by email. You’re not going to get spammed — I respect your privacy. All you will get is the new posts only. Note: any posts that contain video or other website technologies won’t be available in the email version of the posts.

You’re also welcome to share your comments below.

While you’re here, don’t forget to check out our rebel mouse page, to see what else you might be missing.


Share

Comments

comments

Powered by Facebook Comments

War on Health by Gary Null

war-health-featuredGary Null is a radio talk show host an author on alternate medicine. He promotes a number of alternate cancer treatments and dietary supplements, but he is best known for a documentary video he created called the War on Health. In the video he takes some serious shots at the FDA, government, and established medical practices, including medicines and major pharmaceutical companies that determine which health care problems are publicised and researched.

He's received a lot of feedback on his views, and not all of it is good. Stephen Barrett, M.D. has an article on QuackWatch.org that claims his views on health and nutrition are at odds with the scientific consensus and have been described as "dubious at best". Still others, like Frania Shelley-Grielen who writes for the Examiner, claims Null "starts a necessary conservation but ultimately fails to illuminate and misses the forest for the trees." Basically meaning: she feels things have been left out of the documentary that should have been included. Here is the video:

The video is almost an hour long, so you may need to bookmark this page so you can some back to it later.

I leave it up to you, the reader/viewer to decide for yourself what you will choose to believe.

If you don’t want to miss any of these posts: on the right-hand side of the blog is a place where you can enter your email address, and I’ll send you any new posts by email. You’re not going to get spammed — I respect your privacy. All you will get is the new posts only. Note: any posts that contain video or other website technologies won’t be available in the email version of the posts.

You’re also welcome to share your comments below.

While you’re here, don’t forget to check out our rebel mouse page, to see what else you might be missing.


Share

Comments

comments

Powered by Facebook Comments

Ham, eggs and heart disease

not-as-good-featuredHad a baked potato left over from last night because I cooked too much. But I thought if nothing else I could fry it up with something for supper tonight. What if I added a little bacon and some eggs with it? Plus I have a can of brown beans on hand.... Sounds a lot more like breakfast instead of supper, but when you're over fifty and alone, you can eat breakfast anytime you want to. Now I know, fried foods aren't that good for you, but I do my frying in olive oil, so it isn't quite as bad as it could be.

Well, I didn't have any bacon or eggs on hand; just that big baked potato and the brown beans that are just aching to be fried. So a trip to the supermarket was in order. No big deal! Heck, it's only 5 minutes away by car. But once I got there I was faced with a tough decision.

I had just finished off a package of bacon the week before, and last week my 80 year old mother and I had gone out to a truck stop for supper, where we both ordered a breakfast. I had sausages with mine. That trip was a little embarrassing, I'll tell you...

Our waitress at the truck stop must have been 65 years old, and she asked me if I would be ordering from the seniors menu. My mother was sitting across the table from me and grinning. Those two just irked me a bit and I sputtered, "I'm not 55 yet. I only turn 54 this year."

She put her hand on my shoulder and said, "That's all-right dear. We're not splitting hairs. You don't need to order the big meal if you don't think you can eat it all."

Well, I suppose you would like to know whether I ordered the seniors breakfast, wouldn't you? I'd like to tell you, but there are some things a man should keep private.

Since sausage and bacon have recently been on the menu, I opted for the ham at the supermarket. Couldn't stop thinking about the brown beans I had at home. Brown beans would go much better with ham than sausage or bacon. And ham is healthier, right?

ham-sodiumOf course, this didn't mean that I was going to buy a whole ham. Nothing worse (when you live alone) than buying too much of something and cooking it, and then have to wind up making 5-6 meals out of the same thing. So I bought a package containing two thick slices of ham. It was Larson's Sunrise Boneless Smoked Ham. I looked at the food label, and saw it has a rather dangerous level of sodium, but then I thought, it wasn't too bad, because most of the stuff I ate earlier on in the day didn't have a lot of salt. It wasn't until I got the package home, that I discovered the food label was detailing what you would ingest with a half slice of one of these. They are too small to cook a half slice, so if you look at the label to the right, it shows that the full slice will contain 1,740 mg of sodium and 90 mg of cholesterol.

Maybe there is a lesson to be learned here: never look at food labels on Sundays. But hang on, it gets worse....

The packaged meat also contains

  • Potassium Lactate
  • Sodium Phosphate
  • Sodium Diacetate
  • Sodium Erythorbate
  • Sodium Nitrate

Potassium Lactate and Sodium Diacetate are  added to the packaged meat to help produce a longer shelf life and act as inhibitors of Listeria monocytogenes. Sodium Nitrate helps prevent the growth of Clostridium botulinum, which can cause botulism in humans. But, according to an article on Rodale.com, they say that Phosphate food additives could be triggering a host of health problems. The article goes on to say:

In addition to chronic kidney disease and increased mortality rates, phosphate additives have been linked to an increased risk of heart disease, they're thought to accelerate the aging process, and they interfere with the way your body activates vitamin D. Too much phosphorous can also lead to weakened bones. In much of the professional research on heart disease, Leon says, "Doctors are making comments like, Is this the next trans fat? Is this the next cholesterol?"

An article on Livestrong.com claims Sodium Erythorbate can be dangerous as well. Although it is used as a food preservative due to its antioxidant effects and has no nutritional value of its own, it can be dangerous if you're eating a lot of processed foods that contain it. They say:

Sodium erythorbate has been found to cause general side effects such as headaches, body flushing, generalized fatigue and malaise, dizziness, lightheadedness and hemolysis, a condition where red blood cells rupture leading to anemia and other complications.

If nothing else, you can always count on me to take all of the enjoyment out of a good meal. But if this one doesn't kill me, I might post something else tomorrow. In the meantime, if you're concerned about what some of the foods you're eating may contain, don't miss the article on this site titled, Our Groceries are Poisoned. It talks about Genetically Modified Organisms that are in groceries you're buying right now, and how this could affect your health, and the health of your loved ones.

If you don’t want to miss any of these posts: on the right-hand side of the blog is a place where you can enter your email address, and I’ll send you any new posts by email. You’re not going to get spammed — I respect your privacy. All you will get is the new posts only. Note: any posts that contain video or other website technologies won’t be available in the email version of the posts.

You’re also welcome to share your comments below.

While you’re here, don’t forget to check out our rebel mouse page, to see what else you might be missing.


Share

Comments

comments

Powered by Facebook Comments

Smoke the fish, not the leafy greens

fish-spinach-featuredSaturday is usually the day I go shopping for groceries. When you've over fifty and live alone like I do... and maybe especially if you're a man... your eating habits can get in a rut. It doesn't take a whole lot of imagination to go to the grocery store and buy the same things as you did the last week, and the week before that. But sometimes if you don't have much to do on a Saturday, you might cook yourself up a good meal, which you often don't take time for during the week because you have too many other things to do.

Thought I would treat myself to some salmon today. Not only do I love eating fish, but The American Heart Association's dietary guidelines recommend that adults eat at least two servings of fish, which are high in Omega-3s, per week. So not only is it very tasty, it's healthy -- might even help make up for the quick throw together meals I made throughout the work week. And it also has lower levels of saturated fat than other meats such as beef, pork or chicken. It's also high in protein, and low in calories.

I didn't have a lot of chance to eat fish during my married years. My wife and daughter didn't like it. There were a lot of things neither one of them liked, but the beauty of being alone, means you can eat whatever you want. But then again, if you're over 50, you can't help but think about things like healthy foods. Don't tell me it doesn't cross your mind. I know it does. All of us are thinking more about what we eat now, than what we did 10-20 years ago. And it isn't like I have to force feed myself fish. Growing up on the Bay of Fundy in Nova Scotia means I had lots of opportunities to learn to appreciate sea-food. Although, there are certain types I'm not crazy about. I never cared for smelts, and if I never ate another lobster -- I wouldn't miss it.

After I chose my salmon at the supermarket, I thought about what I might like to eat with it. I would certainly have to bake some potatoes, but what else? Spinach. Haven't had spinach for so long, that I had forgotten I liked it. It's another one of those foods that didn't get eaten when I lived with my family. The reason was simple enough. No one liked it but me. I like to add some butter and vinegar to it. For some reason, I've always preferred some sort of green vegetables with fish. Hey! Spinach isn't anything to sneeze about.

A lot of people don't care for Spinach. Even Popeye only ate it when he had to.... Not only did we see this, in cartoons growing up, but who can forget the movie starring comedian Robin Williams as Popeye? He did such a fantastic job with the part. The video clip below is supposed to be the first Popeye cartoon.

Spinach is low in Saturated Fat, and very low in Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Niacin, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Protein, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin E (Alpha Tocopherol), Vitamin K, Thiamin, Riboflavin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Potassium, Zinc, Copper and Manganese. You can read all of the nutritional data about it on this factsheet. And, in an article the Globe and Mail published, "Is spinach more nutritious raw or cooked?" they say:

Cooked! Cooking your vegetables can actually boost their antioxidant content. Heating vegetables releases antioxidants by breaking down cell walls. Studies have found that eating cooked spinach and carrots - versus raw - results in much higher blood levels of beta-carotene, an antioxidant thought to guard against heart disease and lung cancer.

I may be a little lazy. You see I bought a can of Spinach. Undoubtedly, it isn't as good for you as if you prepared your own. The can I bought will give me 24% of my daily intake for sodium, so if you have the time, it might be best to prepare it yourself. Watch the video below as  George Mateljan shows you a great way to cook and prepare it.

If you like this type of cooking video, you can order the DVD, Healthiest Way of Cooking with George, but note... unfortunately it isn't available to be shipped to those of us in Canada. But if it helps, George setup The George Mateljan Foundation for the World's Healthiest Foods and its website offers over 2500 recipes. The website also has a interactive Food Advisor, so in just 5 minutes you can learn what foods are best for you with personalized recommendations.

Interesting to note, that if your family won't eat it as prepared in the video... there are other ways. My daughter refused to touch it when it was served as a side vegetable, but when it was mixed into a Spinach dip and served with breadsticks stuffed with cheese, she loved it. So, some creativity may be involved if you're going to try and encourage children to eat their Spinach. Unfortunately, it's my daughter's opinion that if it's leafy and green, it's only fit for animals.

By the way, I discovered a fantastic website today for all kinds of recipes. Have a look at http://www.thekitchn.com/. For more recipes and articles on food, be sure to check out all of the articles on this site in the Foods Catagory.

If you don’t want to miss any of these posts: on the right-hand side of the blog is a place where you can enter your email address, and I’ll send you any new posts by email. You’re not going to get spammed — I respect your privacy. All you will get is the new posts only. Note: any posts that contain video or other website technologies won’t be available in the email version of the posts.

You’re also welcome to share your comments below.

While you’re here, don’t forget to check out our rebel mouse page, to see what else you might be missing.


Share

Comments

comments

Powered by Facebook Comments

Dog sings the blues and plays piano

You often hear the expression that "the whole family is musical". But apparently some of the neighbours would disagree. After several complaints of a dog howling and piano 'banging' being heard when supposedly no one was home, the family set up a web-cam aimed at the piano on a day they planned on being away. Much to their surprise... the neighbours were right. Here is what the web-cam video recorded.

Funny, this reminds me of a dog I knew. She looked just like this one... 'cept she didn't sing or play the piano.

If you don’t want to miss any of these posts: on the right-hand side of the blog is a place where you can enter your email address, and I’ll send you any new posts by email. You’re not going to get spammed — I respect your privacy. All you will get is the new posts only. Note: any posts that contain video or other website technologies won’t be available in the email version of the posts.

You’re also welcome to share your comments below.

While you’re here, don’t forget to check out our rebel mouse page, to see what else you might be missing.


Share

Comments

comments

Powered by Facebook Comments