Steve MacLellan

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Viewing 10 posts - 71 through 80 (of 117 total)
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  • in reply to: did I do the right thing #1784

    Steve MacLellan
    Keymaster

    Hi Marla,

    You made the decision that you didn’t want to be in a loveless relationship. I don’t think anyone can lay any blame on you for that. But it seems you’re doing a lot of second-guessing on whether you made the right choice. Is this holding you back from moving forward? It’s hard to move forward with your life when you’re viewing everything through the rear-view mirror.

    Moving forward, maybe you can find a way to build a new relationship with the children based on your history. It’s your life, and the good news is it can be anything you want it to be. But you need to take positive steps, and stop thinking of the past. You may be able to salvage relationships with your ex inlaws as well. I get along great with mine.

    Join some clubs; make some new friends. Get on a bowling team, join a book club, volunteer at new places. And most importantly take some time for yourself before dating anyone. Get to know the new you first. Once you’re comfortable with you, then you can always look at finding another partner. Just don’t rush into anything.

    Hope this helps!

    Regards,
    Steve MacLellan

    in reply to: Guitar playing #1734

    Steve MacLellan
    Keymaster

    Steve Krenz shows how to jazz up a typical II-V-I progression:

    The pdf download for this lesson can be found here.

    in reply to: Guitar playing #1726

    Steve MacLellan
    Keymaster

    Sorry, the augmented 5th is used in place of the V7, although it can be used in tunes that have a secondary dominant.

    in reply to: Guitar playing #1725

    Steve MacLellan
    Keymaster

    Nice lesson by Steve Krenz today on the Gibson website on diminished 7th chords and their use. You can view it here, but there are some elements of theory left out. If you have a look at the tab for it… there are a couple of things I would point out.

    Notice the progressions are going up the scale, not down. If you’re modulating down, augmented 5ths are better.

    He also mentioned using the diminished 7th that was a half-step below, and this could be confusing in some situations. For example, in the key of C, if you’re playing the V7 you can play the last bar as a B diminished 7th to take you home but it helps if the root tone is a half-step down so the B would be your lowest note on the fretboard in the chord. Because a G#dim7 has the exact same notes as the Bdim7 but if you don’t have a good bass player, it doesn’t sound as good for a baseline going from G-G#-C. If you have a good bass player, then he would be playing the B instead of the G#, which would help cover you regardless of which chord form or note you had in the baseline.

    See, Steve only touches on this briefly, but the diminished 7th chord can actually take it’s name from any of the four notes that are used to play it.

    in reply to: Fishing #1704

    Steve MacLellan
    Keymaster

    Quebec fishermen pull a monster cod out, while ice fishing. It weighed 55 pounds. See the video below — unfortunately it’s in french:

    You can read more about it here.

    Regards,
    Steve

    in reply to: Guitar playing #1697

    Steve MacLellan
    Keymaster

    Hot for Teacher

    Part #1:

    Part #2:

    Part #3:

    Part #4:

    Full tune:

    in reply to: Did you enjoy Valentine's day? #1655

    Steve MacLellan
    Keymaster

    Hi Donna,

    Funny you would ask that question. Shortly after my divorce I moved back home to Nova Scotia and I had mentioned to a friend, who had been single for years, that I found it a bit difficult living alone. I asked him if he ever found it hard, and his reply was, “You get used to it.”

    And… you do Donna! You really do. Of course like anyone else, I’ve had thoughts of pursuing other relationships, but every time I see a couple fighting over something stupid, I remind myself that this is why I’m happy to be single again.

    Here’s a good example:

    When I first moved home I lived in an apartment. During one of the worst snowstorms in the last decade, a young married women who had three little children was making her way across the parking lot to the shared laundry room. She was accompanied by a girlfriend who must have been spending the night. I heard her say to her girlfriend that “Ya,’ I couldn’t wait for him to shovel the deck off so I did it myself.”

    At that time, it hadn’t been storming for more than a couple of hours, so there was a lot more snow to come. I’m not judging her; perhaps he had done something earlier in the day, so she felt justified in making him feel like an ass over the snow on the deck. But at the same time, I was saying to myself, “See? This is why you want to stay single. I’m never going to let anyone speak to me like that again.”

    LOL… take note, I did not mean to eavesdrop on my neighbor. I had stepped out on the deck to see how bad the storm was getting.

    The young woman’s story goes from bad to worse — they separated. He was holding down 2-3 jobs to support his family and got killed in a car accident going to work one day. :-(

    Regards,
    Steve

    in reply to: Guitar playing #1645

    Steve MacLellan
    Keymaster

    Black Dog — Led Zeppelin

    Anyone here over fifty who didn’t grow up listening to Led Zeppelin?

    What was the name of the album that had Stairway to Heaven on it? Ya’ I don’t remember either. But another really cool tune on the same album was Black Dog — the timing is a bit tricky but here is how it’s done:

    Regards,
    Steve

    in reply to: Guitar playing #1615

    Steve MacLellan
    Keymaster

    Fast Fingerstyle Runs
    Have you ever heard a guitarist rip through a fast run as he plays some solo or song? You may wonder, “How is he doing that? What are the notes he’s using? Is he actually thinking about all of those notes, or is it some pattern?” Well, the answer is that you can create fast and impressive sounding runs with a simple technique incorporating major scales, open strings, and hammer-ons and pull-offs.

    This lesson covers…

    • Using Hammer-Ons and Pull-Offs to Create Fast Runs
    • Combining Major Scales with Open Strings
    • Finger Patterns for Fast Runs
    • Chaining Finger Patterns Together for Longer Runs
    • Drop D Tuning

    You can apply the techniques learned in this lesson to a wide variety of open keys like C/Am, D/Bm, E, A/F#m, and G/Em. Grab your guitar and let’s learn a key that will unlock fast fingerstyle runs in your playing! – Steve Krenz

    You can see the lesson here.

    in reply to: You unfollwed me on Twitter #1614

    Steve MacLellan
    Keymaster

    Hi Donna,

    Yes, I was using the application who.unfollowed.me and you must have been one of the people who came up. There are a lot of people who will follow you for a short time, and then unfollow you, simply so they have a lot more people to broadcast their message to. But these people don’t really want to read YOUR tweets, they just want to make sure that you see THEIRS.

    I could be wrong, but I thought Twitter was supposed to be a social network. And I use it for a couple of reasons. 1) For news; plus…. I follow some of the bigger sites that constantly publish info for the crowd fifty and over. 2) To connect to individuals and groups who are like-minded.

    I can’t begin to count the number of tweets I miss from like-minded people, because my newsfeed was choked with advertisements from people who wanted to get their message out to me, but had no intention of interacting or mixing with me.

    I didn’t mean for you to take it personally, and I’m sorry, I don’t recall who you are or what organization you belonged to. But if you’re not going to be social, maybe you should avoid social media.

    Regards,
    Steve

Viewing 10 posts - 71 through 80 (of 117 total)