Steve MacLellan

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 10 posts - 31 through 40 (of 117 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • in reply to: Guitar playing #2233

    Steve MacLellan
    Keymaster

    You’ve Got a Friend In Me – Acoustic guitar instrumental – with transcription!

    [youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QsrECNCTwh4?rel=0&w=560&h=315

    You can find this transcribed here. This is a pdf file.

    Regards,
    Steve

    in reply to: Guitar playing #2218

    Steve MacLellan
    Keymaster

    How to Play “Bring It On Home To Me” – Blues Guitar Lesson

    Once again, I don’t think these Sam Cooke videos show you how to play the whole tune. I learned this tune a few decades ago, but the version I learned, didn’t sound anything like this. Still… there is some fairly good basic blues instruction in this, so I thought I would pass it along.

    [youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q-uV10siJWU?rel=0&w=560&h=315

    Regards,
    Steve

    in reply to: Guitar playing #2215

    Steve MacLellan
    Keymaster

    How to Play “Sweet Home Chicago” – Blues Guitar Lesson

    [youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vj5Zlgpl6nc?rel=0&w=400&h=225

    This video doesn’t teach you how to play the whole tune. But if you’re new to guitar and chording the blues, you might get something out of it.

    BTW: An update to the plugin that provides the forum for this site is the reason this video is loading in it’s own window. Sorry….

    Regards,
    Steve

    in reply to: Guitar playing #2214

    Steve MacLellan
    Keymaster

    Larry Carlton’s Super Arpeggio

    Did you ever see a guitar lesson online and thought WOW!? This is some pretty cool stuff…

    One of Steve krenzs’ most recent lessons gave me that WOW feeling. He said:

    ” Four-time Grammy winner, Larry Carlton, was one of LA’s top studio guitarists during the 70s-80s. Much of the music we associate with that time period was the work of Larry Carlton. Larry is still as active as ever playing and touring all over the world.

    Larry Carlton is known for his lyrical soloing. He has described his approach to soloing in a concept called the “Super Arpeggio.” If you’re tired of playing old licks and pentatonic patterns when you solo, then check out this super arpeggio concept for a fresh way to get some exciting new sounds when you solo.”

    Click here to watch this lesson now.

    Regards,
    Steve

    in reply to: Guitar playing #2213

    Steve MacLellan
    Keymaster

    Thank you Antoine!

    I add more posts to this thread when I find other things that are of interest to people who want to improve their guitar playing.

    Hope it helps!

    Regards,
    Steve

    in reply to: Guitar playing #2179

    Steve MacLellan
    Keymaster

    Brad Paisley Famous Riffs

    A lot of guitar players are known for their signature licks. Sometimes, even if you don’t know the tune you can recognize the artist by these unque licks. I haven’t listened to a whole lot of Brad Paisley, other than what’s been on the radio, but his method of playing the same note on two different strings seems quite unique to me.

    The gentleman who provided this tutorial (Alexandre Villain) and I have a lot in common. We both use a combination of a pick and use of the third and fourth fingers.

    Regards,
    Steve

    in reply to: Guitar playing #2178

    Steve MacLellan
    Keymaster

    Harvest by Neil Young

    This comes from one of my most favorite albums, from yesteryear. Personally, I don’t play a lot of Neil Young tunes, because I don’t have the vocal range for it. Sometimes if I’m working with someone, I will learn tunes I can’t sing, but typically, years, or even months later they get forgotten.

    The first two videos in this post are are variations that Neil Young did on the tune. As you can tell by the gray hair in the second video, this rendition was years after the original recording. The below these two videos is Justin Sandercoe’s video showing you how to play it. It’s a pretty easy tune, and Justin’s lesson is based off of the original recording which would be the first video.

    Regards,
    Steve

    in reply to: Guitar playing #2172

    Steve MacLellan
    Keymaster

    Led Zeppelin – Going To California

    At the The Earls Court Concert in 1975

    They don’t make music like this any more.

    Regards,
    Steve

    in reply to: Guitar playing #2165

    Steve MacLellan
    Keymaster

    IMPROVISING: Enter the Eleven Tone Matrix

    Andrew Wasson of Creative Guitar Studio says “there are certainly 11 tones. And, how we approach moving around them by; sliding, bending or tapping through pitches – could indeed allow for many more tones than the standard seven found within the basic diatonic scale! For example, take a listen to any number of solos found in jazz music for a clear understanding of this concept. But, because all styles are not jazz, in the video lesson I cover a number of generic principles that can be applied toward utilizing this 11 tone idea.”

    One of the commenters on his post said:

    Define MATRIX: An environment in which something develops. The area, “BETWEEN,” the scales Root & Octave, (those 11 tones), THAT is the Matrix.

    The first post at the top of this page relates to the lick he is playing at the end of the video which could be considered a ladder lick. It would need to be played with authority and it follows a pattern.

    For those of you who might not have a good grasp on chord/scale relationships, you might want to skip this lesson until later. The best way to get away with something like this is to make sure if you’re playing 16th notes, that a chord tone is played on the beat.

    This isn’t a license to forget about scales and arpeggios. You have to learn the rules of harmony before you break them, or else you will wind up playing a solo that didn’t come across as expected. 😉

    Regards,
    Steve

    in reply to: Guitar playing #2151

    Steve MacLellan
    Keymaster

    “Comfortably Numb” solo – David Gilmour, Royal Albert Hall

    Ted Drozdowski, writes columns for Gibson Magazine. He says:

    Pink Floyd guitar genius David Gilmour has composed some of the most epic, soaring solos in rock history. Look — or listen — no further than his essay in vintage Gibson Les Paul Gold Top glory on “Comfortably Numb,” arguably the greatest recorded guitar solo of the ’80s for its compositional breadth, emotional arc and tonal grace.

    I don’t that it’s the greatest, but it certainly is one of the best. And it certainly stand out in your memory.

    Regards,
    Steve

Viewing 10 posts - 31 through 40 (of 117 total)