Category: One Day Only

Windows 7 Explorer Secrets

windows7-featuredOne of the biggest problems a lot of Windows 7 users have, is not understanding how Windows Explorer works, and what can be done with it. No, I'm not talking about a web browser. I've known people who get this mixed up too. The Microsoft browser is called Internet Explorer, not Windows Explorer. Windows Explorer is where you can tap into the power of your computer's file system. RULE #1 -- if you don't know what the file you're looking at is, don't move it, delete or rename it -- just leave it alone.

One of the things even some advanced users have problems when setting up their home office, is working with network drives so you can share files with other computers on the network. Windows 7 Explorer Secrets (Windows Tips and Tricks) by Jack Dunning will show you how to do this as well as a ton of other tricks you may not know are even possible.

For example, in "Chapter Seven: Syncing Files without Windows Professional “Windows Briefcase for taking your work to another computer; SyncToy for easy synchronization.” Windows Briefcase is a file-synchronization system that is helpful not only for Windows 7, but for all versions of Windows since 95." This works great is you're using a Flash Drive, but if you have to use a lot of your files on another computer, there isn't any discussion about an external drive. They are very handy to have.

For those of you who might not be familiar with what an external drive is, it's a portable drive that plugs into a USB port on your computer, and then you can manage the drive's content through Windows Explorer. I use one to keep my clients websites on that I work on. Then if I have to go someplace, I can take along my laptop and plug the drive into it. This way I can work when I'm at the cottage, or staying at a friend's place.

This book is only about Windows Explorer. If you are a novice with computers, you might not get much out of it. For example, if you often download things, and then can't find them afterwards, or if you're still struggling trying to send attachments through email -- this book isn't going to help you with things like that.

The Kindle version of the book is being offered for free for the next 24-48 hours as part of an Amazon promotion. It was just published this month; there aren't any reviews for it yet, but on the page where you can download it, it gives you a description of what you'll discover in each chapter of the book. This should give you some idea of whether you can benefit from it or not.

If you don’t want to miss any of these posts: on the right-hand side of the blog is a place where you can enter your email address, and I’ll send you any new posts by email. You’re not going to get spammed — I respect your privacy. All you will get is the new posts only. Note: any posts that contain video or other website technologies won’t be available in the email version of the posts.

You’re also welcome to share your comments below.

While you’re here, don’t forget to check out our rebel mouse page, to see what else you might be missing.


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Hydrogen Peroxide Cures

h202-featuredDid you know you can use Hydrogen Peroxide to treat arthritis? Apparently you can use it to treat a number of ailments, including cancer and COPD. Funny, most of use people over fifty were used to seeing our mothers treat open wound with it when we were little, but I've been reading it as a lot more uses. A google search will return a lot of results, but one in particular you don't want to miss consists of a warning about taking it internally.  Then I ran across other articles about people using it to help with chronic sinutus. These people are using a mixture to spray up their noses.

My understanding is  there is a food-grade version of Hydrogen Peroxide you can buy that some people ingest, albeit carefully at first. You have to let your system build up to it. My recommendation would be to consult your doctor first to make sure you have the right type; there are several grade of it. Keep in mind that the FDA warns consumers not to drink high-strength grade that is used for medicinal purposes.

Hydrogen Peroxide Cures (Miracle Healers From The Kitchen) by Sharon Daniels details a lot of uses. She says she has used hydrogen peroxide to treat a range of conditions – everything from chronic fatigue immune disfunction syndrome (CFIDS), migraine headaches, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis and more. Many people who have been troubled by lung disease (including bronchial asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and emphysema) have found their breathing easier and had their energy restored by a course of hydrogen peroxide treatments.

The Kindle version of the book is free for the next 24-48 hours as part of an Amazon promotion. It's a great eye-opener to see what all it's been used for, but the title may be a little miss-leading.  It doesn't include cures, as in recipes for people who might be inclined to mix their own concoctions. It just tells you what it has been used for in the past as cures for various ailments.  As always the onus is on you to do your due-diligence to research the options further and the consult with your physician before self-administrating anything that could have an adverse effect -- including death.

If you don’t want to miss any of these posts: on the right-hand side of the blog is a place where you can enter your email address, and I’ll send you any new posts by email. You’re not going to get spammed — I respect your privacy. All you will get is the new posts only. Note: any posts that contain video or other website technologies won’t be available in the email version of the posts.

You’re also welcome to share your comments below.

While you’re here, don’t forget to check out our rebel mouse page, to see what else you might be missing.


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101 Best Soup and Stew Recipes Ever

chili-featuredWhen I was a teen ager, I spent a fair amount of time at a friend's house.  His mother, who had raised seven boys, often kept a pot of chili on the stove, in case anyone wanted something to eat. It was a huge pot. I have a similar pot here at home, but it was my understanding it was supposed to be for  2-3 dozen ears of corn-on-the-cob, which is always a favorite around here, and especially at the beach. Regardless of what it's for -- it's a big pot.

I love Chili. And by friend's  mother made the best chili I've ever tasted. It was fantastic! And I've tried a few recipes here and there but never found one I was happy with. Of course it could have something to do with the way I follow directions. But when I was browsing through some books today I discovered 101 Best Soup & Stew Recipes Ever: Including Gumbos, Chowders & Chili Recipes by Nancy F Thomas. In chapter four you can find six chili recipes,  and look great.

One of the ones I took interest in is the Bulgur Chili. I was reading through it fairly quick and I thought it said "Burger Chili" which brought to mind the chili I was so fond of as a young man. It had hamburger in it. After a quick search I saw on Wiki,  "It is a cereal food made from the groats of several different wheat species, most often from durum wheat. It is most common in European, Middle Eastern, and South Asian cuisine. The word bulgur is of Turkish origin." I suppose I could substitute Burger for Bulgur, but there is another recipe called Spiced Chili, where one of the ingredients is 1 ½ of ground beef.

I'll probably have to wait until the weekend before I get a chance to do some experimenting.  Nothing worse than going to all the bother to cook up something special, ruin it -- and then wind up eating hotdogs because you have run out of time....

I'll have to decide which recipe I'm going to start with. You can likely tell I may have another disaster on my hands, but if you like new ideas for stews, soups and chili, you can get the Kindle version of this book for free today. It's part of an Amazon promotion and will likely only be available for the next 24-48 hours. And if you have a favorite Chili recipe, why not share it below in the comments section?

If you don’t want to miss any of these posts: on the right-hand side of the blog is a place where you can enter your email address, and I’ll send you any new posts by email. You’re not going to get spammed — I respect your privacy. All you will get is the new posts only. Note: any posts that contain video or other website technologies won’t be available in the email version of the posts.

While you’re here, don’t forget to check out our rebel mouse page, to see what else you might be missing.


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Feeling fenced in?

fenced-in-featuredHow many times have  you heard the expression, "That's the way we have always done it. Don't re-invent the wheel." In some situations it may be good advice, but if you're over fifty and starting over, it's the worst advice. You have to find new ways to move on. It's easy to lay blame, but sometimes the biggest roadblock is ourselves.

When I was young boy, my parents had a small hobby farm. My mother loved ponies, so we had eighteen at one time. She was also a school teacher and loved children, so one summer she decided she would offer pony rides to children in a field by the edge of the road. And it was my brother's, and my job to help out. Sometimes we would have a number of cars stopping, and often times more than one child wanting a ride. So we would lead the ponies around a makeshift corral when the riders were little or inexperienced.

I remember it being a very warm summer. We had to make sure the ponies didn't get too hot, so off to the side of the main corral was a holding pen for the  ponies who were resting up and not on duty. Our place was about a half-mile away, so we couldn't put them in the barn to rest.

Not sure how old I was at this time. I might have been ten. I had quite a bit of experience at this age with ponies. As any rider knows, when it's time to go back home, a pony will often  run if you don't constrain them.  This made me wonder about the holding area we had for the ponies who were not serving rides. It certainly didn't seem like much of a barrier to them at all. It was a few fence posts stuck in the ground with a loop of rope stringing them together.  In a couple of places the rope was sagging, and probably didn't clear the ground more than a couple of feet.  It got me wondering why those ponies just didn't step over the rope and head for home.

During a short lull in riders that afternoon, I asked my mother about this observation.  She said the ponies didn't escape because they were fenced in. Of course I replied, that it wasn't much of a fence.  Why didn't they just step over it? She said it was because they were used to be fenced in and not being able to escape, so they didn't know they could.

The same thing happens to a lot of us. Barriers we see as insurmountable are fencing us in out of habit. Stepping over the rope can be likened to being caught outside of our comfort zone. Sometimes it takes a monumental event before we are driven to free ourselves. It doesn't have to be this way.

A Kindle  book that is free today on Amazon is called Tuning In to Inner Peace: The Surprisingly Fun Way to Transform Your Life. Joan Gregerson writes about personal growth, meditation, teaching and life. Her book is a series of 29 lessons that will help  you understand how our thoughts can hold us back. If you're afraid to step over that rope, and head home, this book will give you a fun way to transform your life.

If you don’t want to miss any of these posts: on the right-hand side of the blog is a place where you can enter your email address, and I’ll send you any new posts by email. You’re not going to get spammed — I respect your privacy. All you will get is the new posts only. Note: any posts that contain video or other website technologies won’t be available in the email version of the posts.

You’re also welcome to share your comments below.

While you’re here, don’t forget to check out our rebel mouse page, to see what else you might be missing.


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Don’t you love the holidays?

bring-it-featuredAlthough a little early in the year for Christmas, Spending the Holidays with People I Want to Punch in the Throat by Jen may keep you laughing until the holidays. No doubt, we have all felt this at one time or another, and although I don't mean to sound like a Grinch, sometimes you just can't wait for it to end soon enough.

It drives us to do crazy things! Like slipping off a ladder putting up the outside lights, or driving on slippery roads you wouldn't normally be out on, just to spend an evening being someplace you don't want to be.

More than often it can involve sharing a meal or more. And if numerous relatives have contributed, there isn't anything like eating an apple pie full of cat hair, that a crazy aunt made. Seriously, how could you not think about these things. Every time you visited in the past year, you often see the cats on the cupboards. Heck, I've met people who leave the food and water dishes for their cats on the cupboards and actually encourage their cats to jump up to eat.

Or it could be a young nephew or niece, with an awful cold, and his nose running so bad that you feel your body starting to float.

And the conversations! It would be a blessing if the talk could be centered around the weather, but no, people need to pry, and there is safety in numbers. Or it could be the elderly relative, who can't remember where her teeth are asking your teenage daughter if she managed to get over that awful rash she had last summer.

We are all going to remember holidays like this, and of course years later you look back on them and laugh. But if you get a copy of this book now while it's being offered for free on Amazon for a limited promotion, perhaps it will prepare you for the upcoming season. And if you take a miniature video recorder, you can use the money from Blackmail as a second source of income.

If you don’t want to miss any of these posts: on the right-hand side of the blog is a place where you can enter your email address, and I’ll send you any new posts by email. You’re not going to get spammed — I respect your privacy. All you will get is the new posts only. Note: any posts that contain video or other website technologies won’t be available in the email version of the posts.

You’re also welcome to share your comments below.

While you’re here, don’t forget to check out our rebel mouse page, to see what else you might be missing.


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