Category: One Day Only

Understanding Body Language

body-language-featuredIf something hard and heavy is thrown at you -- you've ticked her off. You may have missed some more subtle hints, like when she was throwing your bags out the door. It doesn't necessarily have to come to this, if you had an understanding of body language. Deborah Bull says, "Body language is a very powerful tool. We had body language before we had speech, and apparently, 80% of what you understand in a conversation is read through the body, not the words." I don't know about you, but if life is a test, I may have missed this lesson.

Of course I'm not the only one. It's reported that a collage professor said, "Kids used to sit back and listen to lectures. Now they're leaning in. Body language has changed." I'm not sure this statement correctly identifies a shift in the language; the shift in the position could mean it's easier to hide the cellphone.

When you stop and think about it, this is how animals and pets communicate with us. They can't talk, but they communicate through body language.

One time when I was 12 years old, I was doing some chores on the hobby farm my parents owned, when a pony who was staked out in the backyard came over and gave me a hard nudge with his head. He wanted a sugar cube. We often carried them in our jacket pockets as a treat for the ponies, but on this particular day, there weren't any. So how do you tell a pony that he isn't getting a sugar cube?

I reached in my pocket and brought out an empty palm and showed it to him. That's a pretty good example of convincing body language, isn't it? However the pony wasn't buying this story. He grabbed my middle finger between his teeth and was applying enough pressure to really hurt. My yanking and jumping wasn't making the situation any better. He just laid those ears back and his eyes were glowing. And yes! I got the message. I could tell he was displeased. But that pony wasn't reading my subtle attempt at body language to show him I wasn't too happy with him either, so I had to take a more direct approach. I punched him as hard as I could in the nose with my free hand. He snorted and reared up a bit, but he got the message and let go of my finger.

As Edward R. Murrow says:

...a blur of blinks, taps, jiggles, pivots and shifts ... the body language of a man wishing urgently to be elsewhere.

Animals are much easier to understand than people. Although like people, they get a feeling for whether or not you're telling the truth, and then, like humans, they choose whether or not they believe you. As I've demonstrated, you want to make sure an animal knows you're telling the truth. They can be quite suspicious by nature. Knowing that we are, at times, more subtle than animals, there are certain clues given by body language that can help you decide if someone is telling you the truth.

By understanding these body language clues, we can improve our ability in understanding what someone is trying to communicate to us; even so far as how they position their body to us when speaking. At the same time, understanding how those who are more perceptive to this method of communication will read your body language, you can learn to guard against giving off the wrong signals by learning how it is interpreted.

I downloaded a couple of free Kindle books today on the subject of body language. They both offer a lot of insight into the mysterious world of weird communication. They are only free for the next 24-48 hours as an Amazon promotion. Here they are:

I think they both offer a lot of information for understanding people. I'm not so much worried about ponies these days; I got that down to a science. I know how to communicate with them. Plus, they're easier to understand, even if they think you're a liar.

If you don’t want to miss any of these posts: on the right-hand side of the blog is a place where you can enter your email address, and I’ll send you any new posts by email. You’re not going to get spammed — I respect your privacy. All you will get is the new posts only. Note: any posts that contain video or other website technologies won’t be available in the email version of the posts.

You’re also welcome to share your comments below.

While you’re here, don’t forget to check out our rebel mouse page, to see what else you might be missing.


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How To Talk To Anyone

let-talk-featuredIf you're over fifty and recently single again, you need to get out and start meeting people. Funny about couples -- even when you're visiting friends, sometimes either the man or the woman will be the one who carries most of conversation, and sometimes the other partner gets used to not having to carry the ball in social situations and is only too happy to let their spouse do it. Of course, now that you're single again, if you were the quiet one, you have to learn how to do it yourself.

How To Talk To Anyone by Susan Jameson can help you learn to do it. The book is new and doesn't have any reviews yet, but it looks like it has some good solid advice. Chapter #1 talks about effective tools for communication, and chapter #2 gets right into "How to break the ice."

There are also sections for job interviews, dating, and public speaking. Plus there is more to it than this. But these two are pretty important. Often times we don't find ourselves in just one new situation. For example, if you moved away after your divorce, you could be looking for a job, or you may have forgotten how to ask someone for a date.

Here is what Susan says about it:

“How To Talk To Anyone” is jam-packed with very simple and easy to follow procedures which will help you develop strong conversation skills with people you know and people you don't know. This skill is meant to help you build lasting connections with people and feel at ease while doing it regardless of your knowledge of the subject or topic.

So if you want to learn the skills to not only break the ice but melt it away with your conversational skills, then “How To Talk To Anyone” is perfect for you!

The Kindle version of this book is being offered free today as part of an Amazon promotion. So if you need to improve your conversation skills, download it now by clicking here.

If you don’t want to miss any of these posts: on the right-hand side of the blog is a place where you can enter your email address, and I’ll send you any new posts by email. You’re not going to get spammed — I respect your privacy. All you will get is the new posts only. Note: any posts that contain video or other website technologies won’t be available in the email version of the posts.

You’re also welcome to share your comments below.

While you’re here, don’t forget to check out our rebel mouse page, to see what else you might be missing.


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Is Alzheimer’s disease preventable?

thefog-featuredDid you know that Alzheimer’s disease is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States? I expect it's very similar in Canada. And most people over fifty find their memories aren't as sharp as they used to be. That doesn't mean that you will develop Alzheimer’s, but one certainly wouldn't want to take any chances. It's said to be incurable, but is it preventable?

My father had it. It was very sad to watch a smart man succumb to it. In the last year or so, he didn't know any of us, although it did seem that once in a while he would get a flitting moment of clarity. The disease certainly seems to be more common these days. One would think after our families experience with it, that we would know the stages of progression. But, the short video below shows it perfectly, so you won't have to wonder about it after you watch this.

Dr. Melody Jemison's book ALZHEIMER'S PREVENTION Protect Your Brain for Life - What Our Parents Didn't Know, is a great read for anyone over thirty. Yes, it's said that people as young as thirty can start developing it. Both Dr. Jemison and The National Institute on Aging, believe that a nutritious diet, physical activity, social engagement, and mentally stimulating exercises can all help  people stay healthy as they age. New  research suggests the possibility that  these and other factors also might help to reduce the risk of cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease. The NIA has a fact sheet you can freely download in pdf format here.

Dr. Jemison claims the disease is largely preventable. She wrote this book after seeing several close family members suffer from it. The information she discovered is amazing. She says her book will "show you how to protect your brain from the deterioration that leads to Alzheimer’s". Important topics discussed in detail are: Nutrition, Exercise, Supplements, Cognitive Reserve and Brain Training, Stress and Sleep, Social and Spiritual Aspects of Brain Health, Genetics of Alzheimer’s and How to Put it All Together. This book is fully referenced.

The book is being offered for free today as part of an Amazon promotion. So click here to download it now before you forget about it. (pun intended). You'll get a plan, and the knowledge you need to help protect you and your loved ones against this awful disease.

If you don’t want to miss any of these posts: on the right-hand side of the blog is a place where you can enter your email address, and I’ll send you any new posts by email. You’re not going to get spammed — I respect your privacy. All you will get is the new posts only. Note: any posts that contain video or other website technologies won’t be available in the email version of the posts.

You’re also welcome to share your comments below.

While you’re here, don’t forget to check out our rebel mouse page, to see what else you might be missing.


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Understanding food labels

food-labels-featuredWith all of the toxins being introduced in our foods, it's now more important than ever to be able to understand the information on the product label. It's a step in the right direction, although it won't keep you completely free from what could be considered toxins like GMO. For example, some of Kellogg's cereal products contain GMOs as previously discussed in another article here. But this has more to do with mandatory labeling which isn't being enforced in North America.

C.D. Shelton's book, Nutrition (Know What You're Buying: How to Read Food Labels) will be a big help to you in understanding how to read food labels, and exactly what they mean. The book is only 23 pages long, so it's a quick read. It's narrated as a mother shopping at the supermarket for groceries for her family. It's free for the next 24-48 hours as part of an Amazon promotion.

Another resource I'd like to mention is an article on the FDA website, How to Understand and Use the Nutrition Facts Label, but keep in mind that the FDA isn't going to warn you about by products included in your food that they have determined is safe for you to eat in small doses.

Still, it's felt that these two resources can offer you some guidance in helping to make sure you and your family are eating healthy. Plus it doesn't hurt to google some of the terms you may not be familiar with. For example, a lot of products on the shelves these days are made from enriched flour. This means the vitamins and minerals have been removed to give the product a longer shelf life. But this causes the product to break down too fast once ingested so it turn into extra sugar. Still, there aren't any FDA warnings about it. It's still safe to eat, just not as good for you.

If you don’t want to miss any of these posts: on the right-hand side of the blog is a place where you can enter your email address, and I’ll send you any new posts by email. You’re not going to get spammed — I respect your privacy. All you will get is the new posts only. Note: any posts that contain video or other website technologies won’t be available in the email version of the posts.

You’re also welcome to share your comments below.

While you’re here, don’t forget to check out our rebel mouse page, to see what else you might be missing.


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Over fifty and looking for work?

finding-work-featuredI know a number of people over fifty who are looking for work. As unemployment rates, in both the United States and Canada, continue to rise, it may be time to get a little more proactive in searching for a job. Just using a resume in this day and age isn't enough. We know each cover letter to include with the resume should be tailored to the specific job you're applying for, but how many of you are aware that potential employers could be checking you out online?

According to Nelson Wang, who is the author of Push: 50 Secrets on How to Land a Job by Creating Social Media Buzz, he says: "More than 90% of recruiters/hiring managers visit a job candidate’s profile on a social network."

That could be a little scary, depending on who is commenting on your Facebook, and what kind of language is being used. Of course, some of what you or others may have posted, can be controlled to a certain extent by setting permissions on your posts as to who can view the content. Still, if you have an obscene but hilarious cartoon that you have posted to your wall from some other profile, the permissions may be already set to public. This means a potential employer could see it. There might be a way around this though, if you don't mind taking a chance...

Nelson's book describes how you can get the most out of social media sites to help you find a job. It talks about using Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn as well as using a blog. A blog can certainly be very useful, because you can list all of your accomplishments. People who are new to blogging don't really need to worry about programming or hosting to do this. You can setup up a WordPress blog for free at wordpress.com that can serve as your main focal point online, and then link to a Facebook Page (not the same as a Facebook Profile) and a Twitter account that have both been created for the one purpose of helping you find a job. If you have this url on your resume, and it includes links to both Twitter and Facebook, there is a much better chance that a potential employer may not go snooping to see what they can access on your personal FB profile.

Jason is right, potential employers will research you online. Before Facebook became as popular as it is, I've had more than one client read through the discussion forum on my business website. It gives them a better idea of how I would interact with people if I was hired, and also, what kind of team player I might be. I suppose, you're wondering how I know this? It's simple -- they told me they were checking me out.

After reading Push: 50 Secrets on How to Land a Job by Creating Social Media Buzz, I may have to put up another website myself. I'm hoping to pick up a couple of more clients this year for my web development business at HomeBusiness Websites, and it just so happens I have the perfect domain name for this new site.

Jason's book is free for the next 24-48 hours as an Amazon promotion. If you're looking for a job or more work, this will certainly give you some valuable ideas.

If you don’t want to miss any of these posts: on the right-hand side of the blog is a place where you can enter your email address, and I’ll send you any new posts by email. You’re not going to get spammed — I respect your privacy. All you will get is the new posts only. Note: any posts that contain video or other website technologies won’t be available in the email version of the posts.

You’re also welcome to share your comments below.

While you’re here, don’t forget to check out our rebel mouse page, to see what else you might be missing.


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