Category: Foods

The Power of Ginger

ginger-featuredThe older people... older than us who are over fifty, knew something about Ginger. I called my mother while I was thinking about writing this article. She is 80 years old. I clearly recall her giving me hot ginger tea sometimes when I was little. I have a feeling it was at times when I wasn't feeling good. She said she didn't remember. It was most likely her mother (my grandmother) who gave me the hot ginger tea. But no.... I clearly remember standing in the kitchen and being passed a glass of it. I remember being told to drink it down, although I do remember that I didn't particularly care for it.

According to the book, The Glorious Powers Of Ginger by Isabelle Wilcox, many illnesses are reported to be remedied or cured by ginger, including asthma, bronchitis, colds, flu, and headaches. I think I was likely given it to help combat a sick stomach. Of course these are only a few of the many benefits of ginger. My grandmother, who mostly stayed at home raising the children and helping my grandfather with the books for running his business, had no medical training. I'm assuming the ginger tea recipe was probably handed down to her from her mother.

It can also be used to help combat gas, diarrhea, nausea caused by cancer treatment, nausea and vomiting after surgery, as well as loss of appetite. According to webmd.com, it can be used for other things too:

Other uses include pain relief from arthritis or muscle soreness, menstrual pain, upper respiratory tract infections, cough, and bronchitis. Ginger is also sometimes used for chest pain, low back pain, and stomach pain.

You may have also heard that ginger is used as an aphrodisiac, stimulating sex drive, increasing sexual performance, and aiding in the feelings of love, lust and attraction. Need I remind you, this website is all about being 50+ and alone, and since you won't be getting any of that... you won't be needing it for those purposes....

The Glorious Powers Of Ginger is being offered for free today as part of an Amazon promotion. If you miss this free offer, you can still pick the Kindle version of the book up for $2.94. In the book you'll also be given simple to make recipes that you can use to quickly gain the full benefits of use without destroying it's natural potency. You'll discover the simple, but powerful ways to increase your health, strength and vitality with all natural ginger!

If you don’t want to miss any of these posts: on the right-hand side of the blog is a place where you can enter your email address, and I’ll send you any new posts by email. You’re not going to get spammed — I respect your privacy. All you will get is the new posts only. Note: any posts that contain video or other website technologies won’t be available in the email version of the posts.

You’re welcome to comment below.

While you’re here, don’t forget to check out our rebel mouse page, to see what else you might be missing.

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Chicken Recipes for Today and Later

25-chicken-featuredBeing single, I often walk past whole chickens in the grocery store. Yes, they're dead. But I find one can get pretty sick of chicken trying to get it used up after its been cooked. I have heard of people who freeze portions to use later, but with little culinary skills and even less imagination, I usually find myself throwing some of it out. But... this is going to change.....

I got a book today titled Twice As Nice: 25 Chicken Breast Recipes for Today and Later by Sandra Liu. She completely understands that you may not want to eat the whole chicken before it goes bad, so her book offers many recipes that you can make quickly to use portions that have been frozen. Unlike other “cook ahead” books, you don’t get stuck eating the same dish over and over. Each time you want to use the chicken, you take out just what you need, and then make a fresh dish from among the recipes provided in her book.

Sandra says:

"And then there is what feels more like a typical day: the dishwasher is clogged again, the internet is down for five hours and I have a deadline, and my darling calls to ask for just one teensy weensy favor for the seventh time that day. Twice As Nice has shortcuts to help me get dinner on the table. On these days, I know I can take some chicken out of the freezer, a can or two out of the pantry, and have dinner ready in half an hour."

Recipes are organized into well thought-out sections on “Salads”, “Soups and Stews”, “Sandwiches, Pitas, or Tortillas”, “Pastas”, “Rice”, and “One-Dish Dinners.” They cover the full range from the quick-and-easy staple (chicken salad sandwiches) to the wow-your-guests spectacle (chicken, rice, and mango lettuce wraps). The recipes for the chicken with red mole sauce and the chicken and chickpea stew are top choices that would each be well worth the price of purchase by itself.

moleEven with the help of this book, I'll probably leave the "recipes for the chicken with red mole sauce" alone. The moles that live around here aren't red, and you can't buy them in the grocery store. They look more like the picture to the right of this paragraph.

Sandra’s unique culinary style is one cup pragmatic and two cups foodie splendor. She has the perfect recipe for the contemporary home cook who wants to put delicious and nutritious meals on the table without a hassle. And, I'm looking forward to reading more of it.

The Kindle version of the book is being offered for free today as part of an Amazon promotion. So download it now to add to your library. If you miss this free promotion, you can still click this link to buy it. It's only $2.91.

If you don’t want to miss any of these posts: on the right-hand side of the blog is a place where you can enter your email address, and I’ll send you any new posts by email. You’re not going to get spammed — I respect your privacy. All you will get is the new posts only. Note: any posts that contain video or other website technologies won’t be available in the email version of the posts.

You’re welcome to comment below.

While you’re here, don’t forget to check out our rebel mouse page, to see what else you might be missing.


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How To Make Iced Coffee

iced-coffee-featuredLet's face it! Most of us love coffee. If you're over fifty, I bet this is how you jump-start your mornings. And if you do, according to WebMD you're less likely to have type 2 diabetes, Parkinson's disease, and dementia. Plus, us coffee drinkers have fewer cases of certain cancers, heart rhythm problems, and strokes.  A day without coffee is like a day without sunshine.

Jeff Bezos said, "In Seattle you haven't had enough coffee until you can thread a sewing machine while it's running." And for those of you who are already retired, it's like one long coffee break. We can never seem to get enough. Of course, If you grind your coffee beans with your teeth, you may be drinking too much coffee! And, if the local coffee shop has awarded you “Employee of the Month” and you don’t even work there, you may be drinking too much coffee. I wouldn't worry about little things like this. Drink as much coffee as you can -- you can always sleep when you're dead.

How would you like to learn how to make the best iced coffee you have ever had? Jeen van der Meer has written a book, How To Make Iced Coffee - 20 Best Iced Coffee Recipes. The book is being offered for free for the next 24-48 hours as part of an Amazon promotion. She says all of the recipes are easy to make.  Here is a list of them:

  • Cold Brew Vanilla Iced Coffee
  • Simple Cold Brew Recipe Perfect for the brewed flavor, but instant availability.
  • Caramel Mocha Iced Coffee
  • French Style Iced Coffee
  • Latte Coffee Shake
  • Not For The Faint Of Heart  Iced Coffee Cocktail
  • Basic FAST Iced Coffee
  • Iced Creamy Mocha Espresso
  • Mocha Coffee Cappuccino on Ice
  • Iced Mocha Coffee Frappe
  • Iced Thai Coffee
  • Instant Chocolate Iced Coffee
  • "Americano Caffe" Style Iced Coffee
  • Spicy Cinnamon and Cardamon Iced Coffee
  • Cinnamon Honey Iced Coffee
  • Pina Colada Iced Coffee
  • Iced Mint Mocha
  • Cherry Cordial Iced Coffee
  • Basic Coffee Milkshakes - Vanilla, Rum or Chocolate
  • Home Cold Brewed Basic Iced Coffee

We have established the fact that coffee is good for you! That doesn't mean all the things you mix with it are good for you, but you know the old adage, "Whatever doesn't kill you; just makes you more awake." So go ahead and download your copy now, while it's free.

If you don’t want to miss any of these posts: on the right-hand side of the blog is a place where you can enter your email address, and I’ll send you any new posts by email. You’re not going to get spammed — I respect your privacy. All you will get is the new posts only. Note: any posts that contain video or other website technologies won’t be available in the email version of the posts.

You’re welcome to comment below.

While you’re here, don’t forget to check out our rebel mouse page, to see what else you might be missing.


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Ham, eggs and heart disease

not-as-good-featuredHad a baked potato left over from last night because I cooked too much. But I thought if nothing else I could fry it up with something for supper tonight. What if I added a little bacon and some eggs with it? Plus I have a can of brown beans on hand.... Sounds a lot more like breakfast instead of supper, but when you're over fifty and alone, you can eat breakfast anytime you want to. Now I know, fried foods aren't that good for you, but I do my frying in olive oil, so it isn't quite as bad as it could be.

Well, I didn't have any bacon or eggs on hand; just that big baked potato and the brown beans that are just aching to be fried. So a trip to the supermarket was in order. No big deal! Heck, it's only 5 minutes away by car. But once I got there I was faced with a tough decision.

I had just finished off a package of bacon the week before, and last week my 80 year old mother and I had gone out to a truck stop for supper, where we both ordered a breakfast. I had sausages with mine. That trip was a little embarrassing, I'll tell you...

Our waitress at the truck stop must have been 65 years old, and she asked me if I would be ordering from the seniors menu. My mother was sitting across the table from me and grinning. Those two just irked me a bit and I sputtered, "I'm not 55 yet. I only turn 54 this year."

She put her hand on my shoulder and said, "That's all-right dear. We're not splitting hairs. You don't need to order the big meal if you don't think you can eat it all."

Well, I suppose you would like to know whether I ordered the seniors breakfast, wouldn't you? I'd like to tell you, but there are some things a man should keep private.

Since sausage and bacon have recently been on the menu, I opted for the ham at the supermarket. Couldn't stop thinking about the brown beans I had at home. Brown beans would go much better with ham than sausage or bacon. And ham is healthier, right?

ham-sodiumOf course, this didn't mean that I was going to buy a whole ham. Nothing worse (when you live alone) than buying too much of something and cooking it, and then have to wind up making 5-6 meals out of the same thing. So I bought a package containing two thick slices of ham. It was Larson's Sunrise Boneless Smoked Ham. I looked at the food label, and saw it has a rather dangerous level of sodium, but then I thought, it wasn't too bad, because most of the stuff I ate earlier on in the day didn't have a lot of salt. It wasn't until I got the package home, that I discovered the food label was detailing what you would ingest with a half slice of one of these. They are too small to cook a half slice, so if you look at the label to the right, it shows that the full slice will contain 1,740 mg of sodium and 90 mg of cholesterol.

Maybe there is a lesson to be learned here: never look at food labels on Sundays. But hang on, it gets worse....

The packaged meat also contains

  • Potassium Lactate
  • Sodium Phosphate
  • Sodium Diacetate
  • Sodium Erythorbate
  • Sodium Nitrate

Potassium Lactate and Sodium Diacetate are  added to the packaged meat to help produce a longer shelf life and act as inhibitors of Listeria monocytogenes. Sodium Nitrate helps prevent the growth of Clostridium botulinum, which can cause botulism in humans. But, according to an article on Rodale.com, they say that Phosphate food additives could be triggering a host of health problems. The article goes on to say:

In addition to chronic kidney disease and increased mortality rates, phosphate additives have been linked to an increased risk of heart disease, they're thought to accelerate the aging process, and they interfere with the way your body activates vitamin D. Too much phosphorous can also lead to weakened bones. In much of the professional research on heart disease, Leon says, "Doctors are making comments like, Is this the next trans fat? Is this the next cholesterol?"

An article on Livestrong.com claims Sodium Erythorbate can be dangerous as well. Although it is used as a food preservative due to its antioxidant effects and has no nutritional value of its own, it can be dangerous if you're eating a lot of processed foods that contain it. They say:

Sodium erythorbate has been found to cause general side effects such as headaches, body flushing, generalized fatigue and malaise, dizziness, lightheadedness and hemolysis, a condition where red blood cells rupture leading to anemia and other complications.

If nothing else, you can always count on me to take all of the enjoyment out of a good meal. But if this one doesn't kill me, I might post something else tomorrow. In the meantime, if you're concerned about what some of the foods you're eating may contain, don't miss the article on this site titled, Our Groceries are Poisoned. It talks about Genetically Modified Organisms that are in groceries you're buying right now, and how this could affect your health, and the health of your loved ones.

If you don’t want to miss any of these posts: on the right-hand side of the blog is a place where you can enter your email address, and I’ll send you any new posts by email. You’re not going to get spammed — I respect your privacy. All you will get is the new posts only. Note: any posts that contain video or other website technologies won’t be available in the email version of the posts.

You’re also welcome to share your comments below.

While you’re here, don’t forget to check out our rebel mouse page, to see what else you might be missing.


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Smoke the fish, not the leafy greens

fish-spinach-featuredSaturday is usually the day I go shopping for groceries. When you've over fifty and live alone like I do... and maybe especially if you're a man... your eating habits can get in a rut. It doesn't take a whole lot of imagination to go to the grocery store and buy the same things as you did the last week, and the week before that. But sometimes if you don't have much to do on a Saturday, you might cook yourself up a good meal, which you often don't take time for during the week because you have too many other things to do.

Thought I would treat myself to some salmon today. Not only do I love eating fish, but The American Heart Association's dietary guidelines recommend that adults eat at least two servings of fish, which are high in Omega-3s, per week. So not only is it very tasty, it's healthy -- might even help make up for the quick throw together meals I made throughout the work week. And it also has lower levels of saturated fat than other meats such as beef, pork or chicken. It's also high in protein, and low in calories.

I didn't have a lot of chance to eat fish during my married years. My wife and daughter didn't like it. There were a lot of things neither one of them liked, but the beauty of being alone, means you can eat whatever you want. But then again, if you're over 50, you can't help but think about things like healthy foods. Don't tell me it doesn't cross your mind. I know it does. All of us are thinking more about what we eat now, than what we did 10-20 years ago. And it isn't like I have to force feed myself fish. Growing up on the Bay of Fundy in Nova Scotia means I had lots of opportunities to learn to appreciate sea-food. Although, there are certain types I'm not crazy about. I never cared for smelts, and if I never ate another lobster -- I wouldn't miss it.

After I chose my salmon at the supermarket, I thought about what I might like to eat with it. I would certainly have to bake some potatoes, but what else? Spinach. Haven't had spinach for so long, that I had forgotten I liked it. It's another one of those foods that didn't get eaten when I lived with my family. The reason was simple enough. No one liked it but me. I like to add some butter and vinegar to it. For some reason, I've always preferred some sort of green vegetables with fish. Hey! Spinach isn't anything to sneeze about.

A lot of people don't care for Spinach. Even Popeye only ate it when he had to.... Not only did we see this, in cartoons growing up, but who can forget the movie starring comedian Robin Williams as Popeye? He did such a fantastic job with the part. The video clip below is supposed to be the first Popeye cartoon.

Spinach is low in Saturated Fat, and very low in Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Niacin, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Protein, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin E (Alpha Tocopherol), Vitamin K, Thiamin, Riboflavin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Potassium, Zinc, Copper and Manganese. You can read all of the nutritional data about it on this factsheet. And, in an article the Globe and Mail published, "Is spinach more nutritious raw or cooked?" they say:

Cooked! Cooking your vegetables can actually boost their antioxidant content. Heating vegetables releases antioxidants by breaking down cell walls. Studies have found that eating cooked spinach and carrots - versus raw - results in much higher blood levels of beta-carotene, an antioxidant thought to guard against heart disease and lung cancer.

I may be a little lazy. You see I bought a can of Spinach. Undoubtedly, it isn't as good for you as if you prepared your own. The can I bought will give me 24% of my daily intake for sodium, so if you have the time, it might be best to prepare it yourself. Watch the video below as  George Mateljan shows you a great way to cook and prepare it.

If you like this type of cooking video, you can order the DVD, Healthiest Way of Cooking with George, but note... unfortunately it isn't available to be shipped to those of us in Canada. But if it helps, George setup The George Mateljan Foundation for the World's Healthiest Foods and its website offers over 2500 recipes. The website also has a interactive Food Advisor, so in just 5 minutes you can learn what foods are best for you with personalized recommendations.

Interesting to note, that if your family won't eat it as prepared in the video... there are other ways. My daughter refused to touch it when it was served as a side vegetable, but when it was mixed into a Spinach dip and served with breadsticks stuffed with cheese, she loved it. So, some creativity may be involved if you're going to try and encourage children to eat their Spinach. Unfortunately, it's my daughter's opinion that if it's leafy and green, it's only fit for animals.

By the way, I discovered a fantastic website today for all kinds of recipes. Have a look at http://www.thekitchn.com/. For more recipes and articles on food, be sure to check out all of the articles on this site in the Foods Catagory.

If you don’t want to miss any of these posts: on the right-hand side of the blog is a place where you can enter your email address, and I’ll send you any new posts by email. You’re not going to get spammed — I respect your privacy. All you will get is the new posts only. Note: any posts that contain video or other website technologies won’t be available in the email version of the posts.

You’re also welcome to share your comments below.

While you’re here, don’t forget to check out our rebel mouse page, to see what else you might be missing.


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