Category: Family

Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

frank-featuredThree things that I loved the most when I was a kid was Frankenstein, Dracula and stories about mummies rising from the dead. It is amazing the tale of Frankenstein still charms the young people to this day -- and it was written in 1823. It's a classic; it will never go out of style. This, coming from someone who used to watch Bud Abbot and Lou Costello  and The Three Stooges on TV. Mind you, we didn't have a whole lot of choice what we were going to watch. We only got two channels, and the second one was so snowy, it was almost impossible to watch.

There have been a number of movies made on Frankenstein. One of the best to date was one that was made in 1994, starring Robert De Niro. It was based on Mary Shelley's book. It looks a lot more modern of course than the one that was released in 1931. Below is a trailer for the movie.

If you're interested, you can buy it from YouTube for $9.99.

frank-ebookYou can download a copy of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. It's in pdf format. Nothing to register for; just click that link. You'll be reading, "A fiendish rage animated him as he said this; his face was wrinkled into contortions too horrible for human eyes to behold..."

One would have thought that the publisher would have been fighting for who got the chance to publish this. But it isn't so. Mary's story is one of persistence and belief; never taking "no" for an answer. When she first tried to get it published, the novel was rejected by Percy Bysshe Shelley's publisher, Charles Ollier, and by Byron's publisher, John Murray. Generations of children thank Mary for not giving up on her dream of having her novel published.

So grab a copy now, so you can share it with your grandchildren. You know they will love it!

If you don’t want to miss any of these posts: on the right-hand side of the blog is a place where you can enter your email address, and I’ll send you any new posts by email. You’re not going to get spammed — I respect your privacy. All you will get is the new posts only. Note: any posts that contain video or other website technologies won’t be available in the email version of the posts.

You’re also welcome to share your comments below.


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How Parents Can Raise Positive, Confident Kids

kids-featuredFree today: Confident Kids: How Parents Can Raise Positive, Confident, Resilient and Focused Kids (The Parenting Trap) The author Karen Campbell says: "Every parent wants the best for their children. We all want them to grow up to be confident and positive adults. Raising a child to be resilient and able to deal with life's ups and downs is also something that most parents strive for. Confident Kids will give you practical strategies for shaping and improving your child's outlook and mindset. Parents have a huge influence over the way their children think and deal with life's situations and events. Happy and successful children usually grow up to be well-adjusted adults who lead fulfilling lives.

Of course most of us who are 50+ now, don't have to worry about raising children ourselves, but we do have our grandchildren to think about. This book seems to offer some likely advice. One of the co-authors, Katrina Kahler, is a World-Class educator who has been nominated for the National Inspirational Teaching Award. She is the co-author of 'The Parenting Trap' series, which include a variety of books that will assist parents in raising happy, confident and successful children. She is a highly experienced school teacher, speaker and parenting adviser and her passion involves helping kids to reach their full potential...academically, socially and personally.

Have a look at the video below to see how raising a child's confidence level can help

Of course there are people who will tell you not to overdo it. Dr. Peggy Drexler, research psychologist and gender scholar, had an article published in the Huffington Post titled, "The Key to Raising Confident Kids? Stop Complimenting Them!" Complimenting them all of the time for their efforts, regardless of how small the effort was, can create more damage than good. She says:

Research with children and families has indeed told us that praise has the opposite intended effect. It does not make children work harder, or do better. In fact, kids who are told they're bright and talented are easily discouraged when something is "too difficult;" those who are not praised in such a manner are more motivated to work harder and take on greater challenges. The unpraised, in turn, show higher levels of confidence, while over praised are more likely to lie to make their performances sound better. Praise becomes like a drug: once they get it, they need it, want it, are unable to function without it.

kids-ebookAnd the author of the book Confident Kids: How Parents Can Raise Positive, Confident, Resilient and Focused Kids (The Parenting Trap) agrees with this assessment. She says in her book, "Yes, it’s important to handle our young child's self-esteem gently, but we must be careful not to overdo it or they may miss out on understanding that they won't always win and also the all-important concept of good sportsmanship and being a good winner and loser."

Sometimes, I think I went a little too far with my 16 year old daughter. She certainly has the confidence, so much so, she doesn't feel like she needs to listen any longer. I can't help but wish, I had bought this book a few years ago. But I've got it in my library now. Maybe it will be some use with the grand children.

Click here to download your copy of this book now

If you don’t want to miss any of these posts: on the right-hand side of the blog is a place where you can enter your email address, and I’ll send you any new posts by email. You’re not going to get spammed — I respect your privacy. All you will get is the new posts only. Note: any posts that contain video or other website technologies won’t be available in the email version of the posts.

You’re also welcome to share your comments below.


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Baby Boomers & Online Dating

dating-guide-featuredThis whole site is about being 50+ and alone without any partner. Specifically it's for those of you who are "good with that". But... people change their minds. Just because you made a lifestyle choice a few years ago, doesn't mean you can't change your mind. It ain't easy being easy alone, and there really isn't any reason why you have to be.

I know couples who are 50+ and who have used online dating websites. They have had great success. If you're 50+ you might want to consider online dating websites. But.... you need to take some precautions too. You need to learn the ropes.

Watch the video below  when Judsen Culbreth discussed her new book with a CBS News interviewer, 'The Boomers' Guide to Online Dating,' which offers advice to help women feel confident in looking online for that someone special.

Click here to watch the video on the CBS website

Here is an excerpt from Chapter #1:

ARE YOU RELATIONSHIP READY?

Before you even think about browsing all those dating sites, find out whether you're psychologically prepared to embark on a new relationship. Take this quick quiz.

  1. My past relationships, though painful at times,
    have taught me to be more caring and accepting. True False
  2. Men are a lot of fun to be with. True False
  3. I'm a lot of fun to be with. True False
  4. An intimate and loving relationship is a top
    priority for me. True False
  5. I believe I can shape my future. True False
  6. Men are so irresponsible. Frankly, I don't know
    why I'm bothering to look for one. True False
  7. I'm looking for a man to make me happy. True False
  8. Love is destiny. If a relationship is meant to be,
    the right man will find me. True False
  9. I can take or leave sex. True False
  10. Shopping and dining at a good restaurant are
    two of my favorite activities. True False

Scoring: If you answered "true" to questions 1 through 5 and "false" to 6 through 10, you're ripe for love. You've learned a lot from your life experiences. You have a joyful, vibrant, can-do way of thinking, and you're open to sharing with a like-minded, intimate partner. Breeze through this chapter to fine-tune your potential. Did you miss a few answers? You may want to reflect on your feelings about men and rev up your enthusiasm. This chapter will help you feel organized, in control, and headed for a good thing. It's your crash course in relationship-readiness.

boomers-guide-ebookIn her book, The Boomer's Guide to Online Dating, Culbreth understands the lives and yearnings of mature single women and speaks empathetically to the concerns of her audience, addressing worries about their desirability, the safety of the Internet, and the availability of good men. Her book combines research; how-to advice; warm, personal success stories; and quizzes and exercises.

She has has more than 30 years of experience in magazines and TV journalism, serving as editor-in-chief of Working Mother, executive editor of Redbook, and the first work/family contributing editor on Today. She has been seen on Lifetime, CNN, NBC Nightly News, CBS Evening News, and Dateline. She divides her time between New Jersey and Alabama.

So rather than tell me, "I can't do this being alone thing anymore," click here to order this book now.

This book won't be a lot of use to my readers who are men. Unless, of course, you want to understand what women may be thinking. And then, sometimes it isn't a bad idea to be prepared. I've know men who buy women's magazines just so they could try and learn to understand them better.

If you don’t want to miss any of these posts: on the right-hand side of the blog is a place where you can enter your email address, and I’ll send you any new posts by email. You’re not going to get spammed — I respect your privacy. All you will get is the new posts only. Note: any posts that contain video or other website technologies won’t be available in the email version of the posts.

You’re also welcome to share your comments below.


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Newtown, CT, December 14th, 2012

I'm at a loss for words...

I won't even watch television movies where a child is going to be hurt. I don't want to see it. Bad enough it's a fictional movie on TV without it happening in real life.

Yes, I'm talking about the tragedy in Newtown, CT, where so many children were killed in their school by a crazy gunman on December 14th, 2012.

To the right is a picture of one of the teachers. This is Victoria. She died a hero. She hid her first graders in the cabinets and closets after hearing the gunfire. When the shooter came to her classroom, she told him that her students were in the gym. He then gunned her down and moved on. She saved the lives of all of her students.

I'm not a religious man. I suppose you could say I was agnostic. If there was a fair and just God.... I don't see how he could let something happen like this.

At this time, I would like to extend my deepest sympathies to those affected by the tragedy in Connecticut. I can't imagine what some of you are going through.


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Plagiarism and the student essay

I was reading through Twitter this morning when I came upon an interesting post by a young follower recommending a site for those who are late passing in their class essays. The site is essaytyper.com, but of course this isn't the only one. There are lots of them, with more springing up almost daily. Some of these are free, and some of these sites offer paid for services. I thought I would give it a try, to see how easy it would be to come up with a fake paper.

It's very easy to use. You just type in a couple keywords and then what looks like a word processor springs up on the site with a title and sub title for the report. Then once you press enter, and hold down the space bar on your keyboard, the program writes out your report. I copied and pasted it into a Microsoft Word document. I had a well written 21 page report.

Of course this information has to come from someplace. I copied one sentence out of the document and copied and pasted it in Google and did a search.  I found the exact same document on www.wikipedia.org.

Plagiarism is a serious offence. Depending on the institute you can bet there will some form of severe discipline if a student gets caught. The high-school here says:

Plagiarism is considered a serious academic offense that may lead to loss of credit for that particular assignment and/or course.

Doing a search for punishments led me to some university websites where I discovered  the punishment can be worse.

If you're a parent or grandparent of a student and you have been asked to read over their paper before they hand it in, it wouldn't hurt to see if the document you're reading is an original.

There are tools for educators too, to use online to see if the text has been copied. Sometimes they aren't even needed. Teachers who know the student of whose paper they are grading, can tell if the style of writing has changed, which indicates a copied section. Or it might be that the paper is written in a level above the student's understanding. Sometimes all a teacher needs to do is keep the student after class for a few minutes to discuss the content of the essay and see if they have a good understanding of the concepts they have presented.

If you find your child or grandchild may be guilty of this, I'd like to direct you to an article written by Jeff Karon titled A Positive Solution for Plagiarism. Although the article is more for educators than parents, I like the idea of having a frank and open discussion with kids on exactly what it means to plagiarize someone's work, what the consequences could be, and how it might be better to avoid the temptation.


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