Category: Cottage Time

Nova Scotia: Cottage for rent

cot-rent-featured  The Bay of Fundy features the highest tides in the world, and at this cottage you'll have a ringside seat to this great force of nature.  Clamming and bass fishing take place right outside your doorstep.

This fully-equipped cottage features 1 spacious bedroom with a queen-size bed, with an additional double bed available via our pull-out sofa bed. For rainy days, you'll find a selection of board games and novels. The cottage also has a 20" TV that pulls in reception from CTV and Global via rabbit ears, although I must admit that reception is variable. We also provide a DVD player and offer FREE COMPLIMENTARY MOVIES. Our current collection of movies numbers in excess of 825, so feel free to request your preferred titles.  If we don't have it, we'll try to get it.

This is the perfect location to re-charge your batteries, and enjoy the peaceful sound of the waves lapping the shore while you sleep at night. There are extensive grounds around the cottage for you to enjoy, and the beach is just steps away.

Many attractions are available locally.  Contact us for  further information. Watch the slideshow below -- contains 10 slides.

As mentioned above, the cottage is fully-equipped.  All you need to bring are your groceries and personal items. This cottage is available on a weekly basis only, at the rate of $500/week, based on double occupancy.  Stays exceeding one week are available at a small discount. There is a $10 charge per night per person for each additional overnight guest. The cottage is available for rent from the first of June to the end of September. A 20% deposit is required near the time of your booking, with the balance to to paid on your arrival.

If you would like more information, please do not hesitate to contact us.

If you don’t want to miss any of these posts: on the right-hand side of the blog is a place where you can enter your email address, and I’ll send you any new posts by email. You’re not going to get spammed — I respect your privacy. All you will get is the new posts only. Note: any posts that contain video or other website technologies won’t be available in the email version of the posts.

You’re welcome to comment below.

While you’re here, don’t forget to check out our rebel mouse page, to see what else you might be missing.


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Full moon February 2013 in Five Islands N.S.

We're still a couple of months away from Cottage time here in Nova Scotia, 'tho the temperatures are seemingly more enticing lately. But the reason for this post is to share with you the beautiful picture my friend Jean Marsh took in the community of Five Islands which is about 5 miles west of where my cottage is. If you click on the picture below, the full size will open in your browser.

50_n

As the time date on the image shows, it was taken during the last full-moon.

If you don’t want to miss any of these posts: on the right-hand side of the blog is a place where you can enter your email address, and I’ll send you any new posts by email. You’re not going to get spammed — I respect your privacy. All you will get is the new posts only. Note: any posts that contain video or other website technologies won’t be available in the email version of the posts.

You’re also welcome to share your comments below.

While you’re here, don’t forget to check out our rebel mouse page, to see what else you might be missing.


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Winter view of Parrsboro, Nova Scotia

This post goes under Cottage Time, although my cottage isn't winterized, so it gets shut down for the winter. It gets fairly cool here in the winter time too. Day times highs expected for this Saturday is -11°C Celsius or for my American friends, that would be about 12 degrees Fahrenheit.

This photo below was taken from a web cam in Parrsboro, about 25 miles west of my cottage in a town called Parrsboro. The website it was posted to can be found here, where this and other local web cams can be found. You can click the image for a larger view.

five-islands

If you don’t want to miss any of these posts: on the right-hand side of the blog is a place where you can enter your email address, and I’ll send you any new posts by email. You’re not going to get spammed — I respect your privacy. All you will get is the new posts only. Note: any posts that contain video or other website technologies won’t be available in the email version of the posts.

You’re also welcome to share your comments below.


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The Darkling Thrush

I was down to the cottage this weekend past. I stepped out on the deck, and just passed my truck, in front of the cottage, was a lone crow sitting in a tree. As you can see by the color of the lawn, the heat has been relentless this year. The grass has turned brown; pretty well cured on the stem.

Thoughts about the summer coming to an end -- my daughter, who has left for the winter, who may, or may not decide to return the following summer, made me think of this poem by Thomas Hardy.

The Darkling Thrush

I leant upon a coppice gate
When Frost was spectre-gray,
And Winter's dregs made desolate
The weakening eye of day.
The tangled bine-stems scored the sky
Like strings of broken lyres,
And all mankind that haunted nigh
Had sought their household fires.

The land's sharp features seemed to be
The Century's corpse outleant,
His crypt the cloudy canopy,
The wind his death-lament.
The ancient pulse of germ and birth
Was shrunken hard and dry,
And every spirit upon earth
Seemed fevourless as I.

At once a voice arose among
The bleak twigs overhead
In a full-hearted evensong
Of joy illimited;
An aged thrush, frail, gaunt, and small,
In blast-beruffled plume,
Had chosen thus to fling his soul
Upon the growing gloom.

So little cause for carolings
Of such ecstatic sound
Was written on terrestrial things
Afar or nigh around,
That I could think there trembled through
His happy good-night air
Some blessed Hope, whereof he knew
And I was unaware.

Sometimes... I can't help but feel like the solitary crow sitting on top of the tree and starring out at the barren mud-flats. What is he waiting for? I am, after-all, alone like him. We are at the cottage, and we are alone. Crows are known scavengers and bad omens. Is he waiting for me to die -- to pick what's left of my sun-bleached bones?

But the "aged thrush, frail, gaunt, and small, in blast-beruffled plume" -- is singing a cheerful tune of hope; perhaps.... something I am really unaware of. Who really knows what tomorrow will bring?

Thomas Hardy, OM (2 June 1840 – 11 January 1928) was an English novelist and poet. A Victorian realist, in the tradition of George Eliot, he was also influenced both in his novels and poetry by Romanticism, especially by William Wordsworth. Charles Darwin is another important influence on Thomas Hardy. Like Charles Dickens he was also highly critical of much in Victorian society, though Hardy focused more on a declining rural society. If you would like to read more of his poems you can click here to buy a 224 page hardcover book from Amazon.com


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Build a home or cottage for under $50,000

 

How would like a home for under $50,000? And how would you like it built from recyclable material? This is what Cob Homes or cottages are.  Although I've only recently learned of them, apparently Cob is an ancient building material, that may have been used for construction since prehistoric times.

Cob is made by mixing the clay-based subsoil with sand, straw and water ; quite possibly, even found on your own land. It may not sound that attractive, but watch the video below:

This book was written by Ianto Evans, an applied ecologist, landscape architect, inventor, writer and teacher with building experience on six continents. If you would like to get your hands dirty and start building your own Cob Home, you may wish to take a look at this. For more information you might consider attending a Cob Workshop. There is a website that has a listing for cob building workshops and events. You can find it at cobworkshops.org

 

Since the walls in these type of homes or cottages are quite thick (up to 2') they stay very warm in the winter, and cool in the summer. They are ideal for a variety of climates.  And it just isn't the walls and roof that can be built with cob. Some counters, bed frames, shelves and even closets can be built with the same material. You are only limited by your imagination.

 


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